NEW YEAR, NEW GOALS…NEW COLLABORATIONS!

 DJF Ignition Grant Program Photo

Today as we all settle into the New Year 2013, we are busy, motivated, perhaps even overwhelmed at all that we need to do and want to accomplish in the days and months ahead! As you rev-up to achieve your personal goals this year, I suggest that you consider how collaboration can help you in all areas of your life to attain the fulfillment and progress you are hoping for in 2013. In my role as Executive Director of The Daniel Jordan Fiddle Foundation, that I have now had for over a decade, collaboration has been the key to our organization’s effectiveness and progress.

In that spirit, I from time to time to feature in this BLOG the writings and thoughts of individuals on the spectrum and others who are making a difference and whom I feel will inspire you in your own journey. Recently, I received the following blog post from an adult individual named Daniel who lives with Autism…

The Gift of Asperger’s  by Daniel Wendler

For many people, a diagnosis of Asperger’s feels crippling.

And I’m not going to lie – having Asperger’s does bring many challenges. It’s not easy to manually learn all of the nuances of social interaction, especially when the rest of the world expects you to know all those things automatically. But having Asperger’s also brings many strengths. And I believe those strengths hold the key to overcome the challenges of Asperger’s. When I was diagnosed with Asperger’s 10 years ago, I was lonely, shy, and awkward.Today, I am confident, comfortable in social situations, and blessed with many deep friendships. I even run a website – www.ImproveYourSocialSkills.com – to help others achieve social success.

How was I able to achieve this? It was because of my Asperger’s, not despite it! When I received my diagnosis, I was presented with a list of social skills that people with Asperger’s often lack. This list sparked an epiphany in me. I realized that my social struggles were not because of something fundamentally wrong with me. I was struggling socially because I lacked social skills (makes sense, right?) Although some people are more naturally gifted socially than others, everyone can improve, and everyone can achieve social success. Improvement looks different for different people, and “social success” will mean something different for you than it will for me. But it’s possible to learn, and to improve. I wasn’t doomed to a life of awkwardness (and neither is anyone else).

When I realized this, I set to work. I devoured books on relationships, etiquette, conversation, body language — anything I could get my hands on. I started to debrief social interactions with my parents and figure out what I could have done better. I made a deliberate effort to go out of my comfort zone to meet new people and make new friends.My hard work paid off. I learned to survive socially, and then to thrive. I learned to make friends, and then how to be a good friendSocial interaction will always be a second language to me. But I am now fluent in that language. My Asperger’s has not been “cured,” but I have learned to thrive. The funny thing is, I never could have overcome the challenges of Asperger’s without the strengths of Asperger’s!  I used my Aspie analytical mind to puzzle through the nuances of social interaction. I used my Aspie determination (some might say stubbornness) to keep studying and practicing even when I was discouraged. I used my Aspie quirkiness and humor to defuse conflict and to find my own voice in social situations.

In every situation, I found that I was using my Aspie strength to overcome the challenges of Asperger’s. Looking back, I realize that for every challenge Asperger’s has given me, it has given me a greater strength with which to overcome that challenge. And for every strength Asperger’s has given me, I have found an opportunity to use that strength to help others.I treasure the moments when my calm rationality allows me to be a solid rock to a friend in crisis, or when my Aspie humor draws a deep belly laugh from a loved one. I take deep joy in my ability to guide others on the path to social success, and great pride when my Aspie insight allows me to see a solution others might have missed. Looking back, I realize that for every challenge Asperger’s has given me, it has given me a greater strength with which to overcome that challenge. And for every strength Asperger’s has given me, I have found an opportunity to use that strength to help others.I treasure the moments when my calm rationality allows me to be a solid rock to a friend in crisis, or when my Aspie humor draws a deep belly laugh from a loved one. I take deep joy in my ability to guide others on the path to social success, and great pride when my Aspie insight allows me to see a solution others might have missed. My Asperger’s has given me the ability to make an incredible and unique impact on the world, and I truly believe that my Asperger’s is a gift. It’s a hard gift, to be sure. But I believe that Asperger’s invites me into a rich life – a life marked by pain and struggle, yes, but also by strength, by joy, by purpose. For those of you with Asperger’s or a similar diagnosis – this rich life belongs to you too. Your road ahead will have challenges, but it will have joy as well.You are the way you are for a reason – you are not broken or wrong, just different. And that difference will equip you to make an incredible impact that only you can make.Your Asperger’s is a gift to you, and you are a gift to the world. Cherish that gift, and don’t give up.

ABOUT THE BLOGGER: Daniel Wendler is the author of www.ImproveYourSocialSkills.com, a comprehensive online guide to social skills. He was diagnosed with Asperger’s as a teenager, and has dedicated himself to overcoming the challenges of Asperger’s and helping others achieve social success. He likes people a lot, so if you are a person, he would love to get to know you! Get in touch by visiting www.ImproveYourSocialSkills.com or www.DanielWendler.com

I hope that Daniel’s story inspires you, as it is inspires me, to find Joy in the Journey! 

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