Do Holidays Get You Down?

We are smack in the middle of the holiday season 2013.  Thanksgiving and hopefully its leftovers are finished.  The wax has been peeled off of menorahs throughout the world, and in some community squares and shop windows fully lighted ones still adorn.  Christmas trees have been decorated with lovely ornaments, and one of the most spectacular ones in Rockefeller Center, New York City is ablaze with colorful lights that delight thousands of shoppers and tourists.  In a few weeks, more thousands of people will decorate themselves for New Year’s eve in Times Square, and everyone, everywhere will bid 2013 goodbye to welcome in a fresh new year.

It is nothing new to remark that all of this fanfare, and the obligatory shopping, overeating, overindulging etc. can get old and can make even the most merry among us want to curl up in bed and never leave our cozy nest. Even if you do not feel this way, you probably know someone who does.

People living with Autism are no different than anyone else during the holidays. For some it is the happiest time of the year and for others it is a completely dreaded misery.  It is important to understand, no matter how one individually feels about the holidays, others may not share your view, and as a caring person, one should try to empathize.  It probably does more good to be supportive rather than to try to drag another person over to your point of view.  So, if Susie hates the holidays and you love them, don’t try to convince her to be a gleeful girl, let her be a subdued Susie—in another words, be supportive. (Consider that supportiveness to be a very wonderful holiday gift to her!)  Of course invite her and include her in your holiday plans too, but be understanding if she says no.  This works the other way too of course, so if Paul is Mr. Holidays, don’t tear down his tinsel.

One way to cope with holiday doldrums is to understand your own personal expectations. An idea is to write down what you hope the holidays will be like for you: who you will share New Year’e eve with; what family members will discuss that may bother you; what you will eat and drink, for instance.  This may help you manage expectations by preparing you in advance for what may come up and what you may or may not wish to do.

Regardless of your perspective about the holidays, it is something we all have to go through as members of our society, like it or not. The days of December will draw to a close and the page of your holiday chapter 2013 will need to end as you herald in a brand new year of possibilities, promises and pleasures.

Wishing you all you dream for and more in 2014—Your friends at The Daniel Jordan Fiddle FoundationImage

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