The Crisis of Incompetency

 

Over the past several years you have undoubtedly read about what some have called an “Autism crisis.” About ten years ago, a well-financed and media savvy organization announced the alarming and growing number of children diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Was this an actual “crisis” or a marketing strategy to create more awareness about Autism with the goal of attaining research dollars, public policy leverage and the validation of their family members’ Autism diagnosis? Real or contrived, the alarm was sounded, and the worldwide public heard it. Much has been achieved because of the highly successful media campaigns centered on the notion of an “Autism crisis,” yet were these media-minded campaigns based on truth or fear mongering? That question has yet to be scientifically or otherwise answered by anyone.

There is however no question that we must continue to do more to assist individuals diagnosed with Autism achieve their potential, not only in childhood, but throughout their lives. The Daniel Jordan Fiddle Foundation, a pioneer in the advancement of programs, public policy, resources and support systems benefiting the diverse population of adults diagnosed with Autism, has led the charge to enhance general awareness that Autism is a lifelong condition that needs the engagement of society as a matter of human rights to open doors of opportunity so that adult individuals can live, work and recreate as they choose. The message of the all-volunteer run Daniel Jordan Fiddle Foundation is not contrived as a marketing strategy; it is the reality for adults diagnosed with Autism.

There have been many achievements accomplished since The Daniel Jordan Fiddle Foundation began its mission almost sixteen years ago, and one measure is that there are several other organizations and advocates calling attention to adult autism. But now, in 2016, with all the new attention being paid to adult autism, is it being done in a way that will truly affect change, or is it yet another marketing strategy for those seeking to jump on the bandwagon of what is the “topic of the day” so that they or their organization can get their name in lights yet again? New books have been written recently, interviews by well-positioned media darlings have been had, the same voices and faces we have seen for decades on television or writing books are again labeling what they proclaim is a new “Autism crisis.” The “self-anointed, popular clique” of “self –proclaimed experts” are at it again. The question comes to mind: does this really help the adult individuals diagnosed with Autism live better and more fulfilling lives, or does this help the authors and organizations line their pockets and get their name in lights as they proclaim the next “Autism crisis?” Something to think about, as history repeats itself.

Should we as a society, again follow like sheep in a herd as the next “Autism crisis” is heralded or should we question the authors, the media darlings and those who have made a name for themselves in the business of Autism as to the accuracy of their proclamations?

Ask any adult diagnosed with Autism, or in many cases his or her parent, since many cannot advocate for him/ herself, what their biggest challenge is and they will tell you it is the broken system. When a person transitions from school age entitlements to adult life the system of supports, the stream of information, and the selection of services are incompetently managed through a bureaucratic system that is mind-boggling. The broken system is the crisis that needs addressing, and this not only affects children transitioning to adult life diagnosed with Autism but all children diagnosed with a disability. The call to action that needs to be heard is a call to change the broken system of incompetency.

Please let’s not again fall prey to the voices who have access to media and those who possess the power of money. Let us listen to the individuals and families once and for all, not the self-proclaimed prophets who profit.

The crisis is not a new “Autism crisis” just because those we hear in the media now have adult children and proclaim it so. The crisis is one of an incompetent system that has been around for decades and will continue to exist unless we as the public stop “walking” in the wrong direction and take real steps in actions to change the systems on which adults diagnosed with Autism rely.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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